Compare to her coy mistress and sonnet 116

To the Reader of these Sonnets Into these Loves who but for Passion looks, At this first sight here let him lay them by And seek elsewhere, in turning other books, Which better may his labor satisfy. My verse is the true image of my mind, Ever in motion, still desiring change, And as thus to variety inclined, So in all humours sportively I range.

Compare to her coy mistress and sonnet 116

O, stay and hear; your true love's coming, That can sing both high and low: Trip no further, pretty sweeting; Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man's son doth know. In delay there lies not plenty; Then, come kiss me, sweet and twenty, Youth's a stuff will not endure. Love Sonnet 1 From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty's rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thy self thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel: Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament, And only herald to the gaudy spring, Within thine own bud buriest thy content, And, tender churl, mak'st waste in niggarding: Pity the world, or else this glutton be, To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.

Upward Love Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

Compare to her coy mistress and sonnet 116

Love Sonnet 29 When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featur'd like him, like him with friends possess'd, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

Love Sonnet 40 Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all; What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call; All mine was thine before thou hadst this more. Then if for my love thou my love receivest, I cannot blame thee for my love thou usest; But yet be blamed, if thou thyself deceivest By wilful taste of what thyself refusest.

I do forgive thy robbery, gentle thief, Although thou steal thee all my poverty; And yet, love knows, it is a greater grief To bear love's wrong than hate's known injury. Lascivious grace, in whom all ill well shows, Kill me with spites; yet we must not be foes.

Love Sonnet 44 If the dull substance of my flesh were thought, Injurious distance should not stop my way.

Shakespeare - Love Poems

For then, despite of space, I would be brought From limits far remote where thou dost stay. No matter then although my foot did stand Upon the farthest earth removed from thee. For nimble thought can jump both sea and land As soon as think the place where he would be.

But, ah, thought kills me, that I am not thought, To leap large length of miles when thou art gone, But that, so much of earth and water wrought, I must attend times leisure with my moan, Receiving naught by elements so slow But heavy tears, badges of either's woe.

Love Sonnet 55 Not marble, nor the gilded monuments Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme; But you shall shine more bright in these contents Than unswept stone, besmear'd with sluttish time.

Iridis-photo-restoration.com: How do Writers Create Tension and Suspense?

When wasteful war shall statues overturn, And broils root out the work of masonry, Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn The living record of your memory. So, till the judgment that yourself arise, You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes.

Love Sonnet 63 Against my love shall be as I am now, With Time's injurious hand crush'd and o'erworn; When hours have drain'd his blood and fill'd his brow With lines and wrinkles; when his youthful morn Hath travelled on to age's steepy night; And all those beauties whereof now he's king Are vanishing, or vanished out of sight, Stealing away the treasure of his spring; For such a time do I now fortify Against confounding age's cruel knife, That he shall never cut from memory My sweet love's beauty, though my lover's life: His beauty shall in these black lines be seen, And they shall live, and he in them still green.

Love Sonnet Let not my love be called idolatry, Nor my beloved as an idol show, Since all alike my songs and praises be To one, of one, still such, and ever so.

Kind is my love to-day, to-morrow kind, Still constant in a wondrous excellence; Therefore my verse to constancy confined, One thing expressing, leaves out difference. Fair, kind, and true, is all my argument, Fair, kind, and true, varying to other words; And in this change is my invention spent, Three themes in one, which wondrous scope affords.Best-Loved Poems (Dover Thrift Editions) [Philip Smith] on iridis-photo-restoration.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Here are some of the most-loved poems in .

IDEA in Sixty-Three Sonnets

Analysis of Keats' Captivating and Dismal Ballad "La Belle Dame Sans Merci" - John Keats is a spell binding poet, who lived a short life of 25 years, but left behind a towering legacy in the Romantic period. 1. Long sentences - (1) writers create a list of fearful or worrying details, which creates an overwhelming, claustrophobic or intense feeling.

Compare to her coy mistress and sonnet 116

(2) Writers build suspense by leaving the most shocking thing to the end of a long sentence. + Get more on how to build tension through sentence construction here.

O Mistress Mine O Mistress mine, where are you roaming? O, stay and hear; your true love's coming, That can sing both high and low: Trip no further, pretty sweeting; Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man's son doth know.

O Mistress Mine

The HyperTexts The Most Beautiful Poems in the English Language Which poets wrote the most beautiful poems in the English language? In one person's opinion, these are the most beautiful poems of all time the most beautiful poems ever written the utterly transcendent masterpieces.

Sonnet also only has one verse, whereas to his coy mistress has 3, each stanza changing the tone and mood of the poem. Sonnet conveys the view of love as innocent, free of worry and concern.

It overlooks other aspects of love, such as sex or divergence, and focuses on .

The Most Beautiful Poems in the English Language